Welcome to my Astrophotography Blog!

This is a journal of my adventures in astrophotography -- taking images of distant celestial objects. Please look around and feel free to add your comments, questions, and critique to any of the entries by clicking the "comments" button on the bottom of each entry -- or just say "howdy!

And don't forget to click on the images for a larger view!

So choose either the Red pill or the Blue pill and follow me down the wormhole....

JOhn

Comanche Springs Star Party

Comanche Springs Star Party
Doin' my thang at the Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus (where I often become a "red ghost")

Dallas Sky

Rancho Venado Sky

Atoka Sky

Camanche Springs Sky

Friday, October 2, 2009

Comet Hunter

This is an image of the Horse Head/Flame and M42 in Orion (the Hunter). And if you look closely you will see a "wanderer" passing right between them -- Comet 217P/Linear.

Although not a big and bright comet, it does sport a small tail and is particularly beautiful for the path it has chosen!

I noticed the comet was well placed last Monday morning, so I decided to have an adventure and make the drive to the Atoka dark site to shoot this composition. I took a nap, got up and left about 1:00am, started shooting by 3:30am, finished and headed home about 6:30am as the sun was coming up. Okay, maybe a little crazy but I think the photo was worth it.

AstroTrac mount
Canon XSI ISO 800
Nikon 180mm f/4
24 x 3min
Maxim DL, CS4

Be sure to click on the image for a closer view!

P.S. -- I hope somebody got my "play on words" with the title : )

4 comments:

Dave Adshead said...

That's an excellent photograph and the comet is the icing on the cake.

Regards
Dave

Neutronman said...

Thanks Dave -- it was a fun shoot.

Tim Hatcher said...

Beautiful shot, John. It's ironic how exciting it is to see a comet, even though we can't perceive their movement. I can still recall how thrilled I was to track down Halley's Comet in December of 1985, a couple months before it became significantly visible.

Neutronman said...

Howdy Tim!

Yes, that is the charm and challenge of visual astronomy -- seeking and finding these elusive ancient photons. I remember looking for Halley, but never spotting it. It is great you did! But I certainly remember being totally blown away by Hale Bopp in 97 (it was easily visible naked eye even at dusk in downtown Dallas).

Tim -- Are you in town? Lemme know if you ever want to join us at a star party or dark site.